Mix-in Unified and Segregated Syntax: An (Extended) Example

[Estimated Reading Time: 5 minutes] Yesterday I initially posted that you couldn’t mix Unified Syntax with “traditional” interface and implementation sections. Or what I am now calling Segregated Syntax. As sometimes happens, shortly after writing what I thought I knew to be true I discovered it wasn’t ! Sorry about that. 🙂 I promised to illustrate the scenario where I found it both possible and useful, and here it is.

Fire, Walk With Me

[Estimated Reading Time: 3 minutes] This final post in the mini-series re-creating a random number app for OS X, Android and .NET has taken a while not because it’s complicated but because I’ve been distracted by a far more significant cross-platform project and some significant and exciting developments in the world of Fire and Elements. More on that later First, let’s get this .NET app out of the way.

Previous Post Now Fixed

[Estimated Reading Time: < 1 minute] Something made me check the post I published yesterday and it’s a good job I did because I found that WordPress had severely truncated it (perhaps something to do with the update to 4.5.1 that I did later on ?). In any event, that previous post has now been restored (fortunately the previous revision in the WordPress history was still more or less complete), so if you thought it had cut short rather abruptly, you weren’t wrong, and the full post is now available as intended.

Come on Baby, Light My Fire

[Estimated Reading Time: 13 minutes] Earlier this year, the Fire IDE for Elements was officially released after a fairly extensive beta. I have previously stuck with Visual Studio for the [relatively little] Elements work I have been doing but problems with my VM solution on a recently acquired MacBook Pro gave me the impetus to spend some quality time with Fire, and I have to say it is very impressive.

What’s In a Number .. ?

[Estimated Reading Time: 4 minutes] Last week I picked up a Nokia 520 Windows Phone for what I consider to be an absolute bargain price (well under the NZ$299 RRP) specifically as a development handset to allow me to explore the Windows Phone support offered by Oxygene. I’ve only just started down this road but have already come across a couple of things that might help people who might be scratching their heads (as I was) when getting started.