Retrofit – Handling Different Responses

In my previous post I provided a simple example of how to use Retrofit to define, create and use a REST API client. Even in that simple example the issue of how to deal with different responses to a request came up. That is, where the response we receive does not conform to the strongly typed response we expected (or hoped for). Here’s how we deal with that, in a strongly typed way.

Using Retrofit with Oxygene

I’ve recently been working on a new project involving an Azure hosted ASP.NET MVC WebApi application (actually a pair of them) and native mobile and web applications. Everything is – of course – built using Oxygene. For the Android mobile app I was looking for a REST API client library and have settled upon Retrofit and thought I would share the experience.

Mix-in Unified and Segregated Syntax: An (Extended) Example

Yesterday I initially posted that you couldn’t mix Unified Syntax with “traditional” interface and implementation sections. Or what I am now calling Segregated Syntax. As sometimes happens, shortly after writing what I thought I knew to be true I discovered it wasn’t ! Sorry about that. 🙂 I promised to illustrate the scenario where I found it both possible and useful, and here it is.

Previous Post Now Fixed

Something made me check the post I published yesterday and it’s a good job I did because I found that WordPress had severely truncated it (perhaps something to do with the update to 4.5.1 that I did later on ?). In any event, that previous post has now been restored (fortunately the previous revision in the WordPress history was still more or less complete), so if you thought it had cut short rather abruptly, you weren’t wrong, and the full post is now available as intended.

On The Shoulders of Giants…

When discussing mobile device application development using Oxygene or other RemObjects Elements technologies, the question of user interface designers doesn’t usually take long to come up (particularly with Delphi developers). Up to now the answer has always been Xcode Interface Builder for iOS/OS X, Visual Studio WinForms/WPF Designers for .Net and… um… your favourite text editor for Android (if you don’t like the XML editing facilities in Visual Studio). But not for much longer.